Archive For The “Finland” Category

Three delicious recipes from the forest in Finland

In Finland, you can find so many edible, little things in the nature and they taste delicious. We have listed three natural recipes for you to read!

For instance, there are wonderful berries and mushrooms which you can pick from the bushes. We have, in Finland, this thing called “every man’s rights”. This basically means that anyone could just visit a forest or field and pick some berries or mushrooms.

My personal favorite are blueberries. Blueberries are sweet, but unlike candies, these berries are also healthy for you. You can combine blueberries with so many different food, e.g., ice cream and pies. It is fairly easy; you don’t have to be a master chef in order to create this delicious blueberry pie. Here’s a recipe.


Blueberry pie

Second favorite what most Finns pick up from the forest is chanterelle. Chanterelle is a mushroom, tasteful and maybe the most known one. There are some preparations you have to do with the chanterelles before cooking it, but it is certainly worth it. Here’s a nice chanterelle risotto recipe for you to make your friends and family happy.


The third recipe is made from nettles. I know picking nettles could be painful if you are not well covered when gathering them, but if you put proper clothes on and parboil them, you’ll be fine. Here’s one nice nettle soup recipe for you for the cold summer evenings.


Nettles

There are many benefits from eating these natural foods from the forest. For example, it has been studied that blueberries could prevent cancer, they also increase your brain capacity and easy your metabolism system. Chanterelles also have its own benefits, e.g., full of vitamins and irons.

You can have a perfect three-course meal with these recipes listed above. Start with the soup, then have the chanterelle risotto, and finally the blueberry pie as dessert. Have fun preparing this Scandinavian course meal and remember to eat well!





 

 

7 Secret and Most Charming Finnish Towns

Helsinki, Tampere, Turku are undoubtedly highlights, but visiting the small Finnish villages gives the traveler a more intimate, authentic, and relaxed view of Finland. Dotted around this land of lakes and forests are a number of truly stunning towns. Here are 7 of our favorites:

Porvoo

 

Porvoo has been loved by some of Finland’s greatest poets and artists. It is the second oldest city in Finland and evidence of its long history can still be seen and felt as you walk its charming streets. The historical old town boasts lots of pretty, colorful traditional wooden houses, which are an amazing sight to see. Porvoo is also famous for its countless interior design shops and always has been a source of inspiration for many local designers.

Wooden houses in Porvoo

 

Hanko

 

It may come as a surprise for some people, but Finland has beaches too. Hanko is a summer paradise for anyone who loves sun, sandy beaches and sea combined with the old town’s charming atmosphere, colorful events and enticing restaurants. Hanko is often spoken of as Finland’s Hampton or the Finnish riviera.

Hanko beach

 

Mariehamn

 

Mariehamn is the capital of Åland Island, an autonomous Swedish-speaking territory in Finland. Walking around the small center, you will see streets full of colorful wooden buildings and houses that really bring the town to life, either in summer or in winter. Mariehamn is the perfect antidote to a hectic, big city life style of the Baltic Sea capitals: Stockholm, Helsinki, Tallinn and St. Petersburg. The town was also once the home for the world’s largest oceanic sailing ships and therefore, there is a large marina to explore and a museum ship anchored in the city’s western harbor.

Mariehamn islands

Raseborg

 

There are a number of things to see in Raseborg, both man-made and natural. There are historic ironworks of Fiskars and Billnäs, Raseborg castle ruins, the Svartå Manor and Ekenäs with its quaint small wooden houses to cheer you up on a dark day. On the natural side, Raseborg is a good jumping-off point to explore the magnificent archipelago, which contains Ekenäs National Park.

Raseborg castle

 

Salla

 

One of the most important Finnish experience is, without any doubt, sauna. Salla is a great place to get an authentic sauna experience by enjoying the relentless sauna heat and afterwards, going swimming in the ice-cold, crystal clear lake. As Salla is in Lapland, there are tons of other great winter activities there, so make sure you stay for a few days to experience them all.

Salla cottage

 

Naantali

 

Naantali is the town of a thousand islands. The highlights of sunny Naantali are the idyllic old town and the nearby archipelago. There is a shimmering energy in the heart of the town with its lively cafes, restaurants, terraces and a world of colorful boutiques. The town’s well-known sights are Moominworld, Naantali Spa Hotel and Kultaranta – the summer residence of the President of Finland.

Naantali islands

 

Saariselkä

 

Ever dreamt of sleeping in an igloo? Ever dreamt of sleeping in an igloo with a glass roof, perfectly suited for Aurora Borealis-hunting? Then Saariselkä is your place to go. You can take a sled-dog safari to witness the beauty of what real winter looks like or come in June or July to find out the real meaning of White Nights.

Saariselkä igloo

 

Also, don’t forget to check our Finland’s Bucket List for the best experiences in this magic country.


5 facts about Finland that you should know

If you’re planning to study in Finland in the future, then these quick facts about Finland might be interesting for you. Here are 5 quick facts about Finland!

1. National Animal

Many countries have an animal or bird as a national animal. So what is it for Finland?

The Finns have seven national nature symbols, which received their status through public polls in the 1980s and ‘90s. The reason that Finland has so many national natural symbols is because the nature is very dear to the Finns. The national nature symbols are interlinked with Finnish mythology, traditions and popular culture. Many have been featured on postage stamps, logos and on pre-euro Finnish banknotes and coins.

Brown bear is the national animal of Finland. They feature noticeably in Finnish mythology, including the national folklore epic Kalevala. The Kalevala is a 19th century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian. The Kalevala played an instrumental role in the development of the Finnish national identity.

2. Finland has more saunas than cars

There are more saunas than cars in Finland; there are 2 million saunas in Finland for a population of only 5 million. The Finns consider their saunsa as a necessity, right up there with rye bread and vodka. There is this famous Finnish saying that goes “Build the sauna, then the house.” Even a Burger King located in Helsinki has the world’s first in-store sauna and spa, and you can order in food.



 

 

3. Official Languages

The two main official languages of Finland are Finnish and Swedish. Finnish is naturally the language of the majority, 91% of the population speaks Finnish as their first language, while 5.4% has Swedish as their first language.

However, you don’t need to speak Finnish or Swedish to enjoy your expat life in Finland, the only language you’ll need is English. Finland is placed among the top four countries in the world when it comes to the fluency of English, based on the EF English Proficiency Index.

 

4. Personal Space

Every country has its own cultural habits; certain things you do at one place and it is totally fine and understood. You do the same thing at another place and it might be totally misunderstood.

For instance, Finns respect the personal space of each other a lot. Someone said that the comfortable personal space between strangers is approximately 1,5 meters. So if you are standing too close to someone while talking you will notice that Finn would try to get a bit further from you. Also touching strangers while talking tot hem might turn into an awkward situation. In more Southern cultures, for example, it is acceptable for someone to tap on someone’s shoulder or hold his/her arm for a second as a sign of sympathy.



Personal space in Finland. It's a fact.

 

Imgur: 

5. “Weird” Championships

Let’s end this facts list with a special one. Finland hosts annual “weird” world championships. Just to mention one, Finland is the host of world championship in air guitar annually. Air guitar is a form of dance and movement in which the performer pretends to play an electric guitar. It usually consists of strumming and picking motions and is often coupled with lip-synching or loud screaming.

It’s not what you play, it’s how you play it”. Every year, air guitarists from all around the world buy their tickets to Oulu in Finland. However, not every guitarist can just enter his name and attend the world championship competition. They have to be tested first and are national champions.


Air guitar and other weird championships are facts in Finland

 

If you haven’t read our previous blog about TOP5 weird-looking Finnish foods yet, I suggest you to  read it right here!

 

Sightseeing in Finland’s Manchester

When you come to study or just for quick visit to Tampere, or’’Finland’s Manchester’’ there are some places you must see! Tampere is known as one of the education centers in Finland. There are Tampere University, Tamperee Technical University and Universities of Applied Sciences. Also, there are many great sightseeing’s to spot!

Pyynikki Observation Tower

 

At Pyynikki Observation Tower you can see the city of Tampere. The tower is famous for its donuts (the best in Tampere), which are made in the same facilities. The tower is in a beautiful area of Pyynikki. After you have looked over Tampere from the top, you may walk along the peaceful trails in the woods and do some exercise on the famous stairs of Pyynikki, where many hockey train.

Pyynikki observation tower

 

 

Tampere Cathedral

 

Cathedral is Lutheran church in Tampere and the seat of the Diocese of Tampere. Church is famous for its frescoes, painted by the Hugo Simberg between 1905 and 1906. The paintings were highly criticized at their time. You can admire this church in the city center of Tampere. Tampere cathedral is surrounded by a beautiful little park, where you may have a picnic.

Tampere Cathedral

 

 

Vapriikki museum central

 

At Vapriikki museum central you can see several exhibitions with just one single ticket. For example, at this moment there is an exhibition about the Forbidden City. Vapriikki is located in the historical old factory Tampella, next to Tampere’s courthouse.

Vapriikki museum

 

Amusement park Särkänniemi

 

Amusement park Särkänniemi has over 30 rides and many other attractions, such as Doghill Fairytail Farm, Planetarium and Aquarium. At Särkäniemi gourmets, fun lovers and thrill seekers and animal enthusiastic can have adventure of their life! Easy arriving possibilities to Särkänniemi are possible because it is located in the heart of the city.

Amusement park Särkänniemi

Näsinneula Tower

 

Näsinneula is the heart of Tampere. The peak of the tower goes up to 168 meters.  With a clear weather, you can see almost up to 20 kilometers. You can also have the most delicious food at Näsinneula restaurant with the beautiful view of Tampere. While you enjoy your five courses meal, you can see each corner Tampere because the restaurant rotates around itself.

Näsinneula tower

 

Hatanpää Arboretum

 

Arboretum is located in the field, where Hatanpää mansion used to be. It was established in the 1970 century. You may see many kinds of trees, bushes and flower species. All the species have a name tag for the observers to recognize the kind.

Hatanpää arboretum

 

Amuri Museum of Workers’ Housing

 

The museum area is a typical enclosed quarter of the 1880´s including 32 apartments, which illustrates the life of local industrial workers from 1880 to 1970. Interiors from different periods. Two shops, a bakery and a public sauna. At Worker’s Housing museum, you can see yourself how people used to live in the 80s.

Amuri Museum of Workers’ Housing

 

Come to Finland’s own Manchester and explore the great sightseeing here yourself!

 

 

 

Finland bucket list

There is so much to love about Finland even before you get there. If you have ever dreamt of seeing the Northern Lights, meeting real Santa Claus and crossing the magical Arctic Circle, or enjoying the authentic Finnish sauna and taking a refreshing dip in the icy lake afterwards, Finland has probably made its way on to your travel bucket list.

But once you get to Finland, you will discover there is so much more to this country than you anticipated. That original bucket list? As soon as you check one item off, then you add another and check off dozens more. Here are a few of those list-worthy experiences to get you started dreaming of Finland:

 

Girl in the Finnish forest

 

Spot the Northern Lights, check.

 

The thrill of witnessing the Aurora Borealis is a once-in-a-lifetime experience for many people. Finland is one of the best places in the world to spot this unique natural phenomenon. The Northern Lights are visible on roughly 200 nights a year or every other clear night in Finnish Lapland. On the Finnish Meteorological Institute’s website you can even sign up for free email alerts sent whenever you are able to view the nature’s most spectacular light show.

 

Enjoy the Husky Safari, check.

 

Experience unforgettable moments and thrill of speed in a husky sled ride through the forest. Friendly, active and jolly huskies will absolutely make your day pulling you at a speedy pace through the breathtaking Lappish scenery. Doesn’t it sound like the best sightseeing tour you can imagine?

 

Husky ride

 

Meet Santa Claus, check.

 

Everyone knows that the one and only real Santa comes from Finland. Santa’s official office on the mysterious Arctic Circle is open each day of the year for everyone. Santa and his team of little helpers and furry reindeer friends are ready to deliver happiness and welcome you all year around!

 

Experience the Finnish Sauna, check.

 

There is no better place in the world to experience a sauna than in Finland, the country that invented it. The Finnish Sauna is not just a “popular thing to do” in Finland, it is a part of the national culture. For the full sauna experience, you should consider going to sauna next to a lake, so you can cool off with a plunge into the icy water. Having grilled sausages and beer is a very typical Finnish after-sauna experience.

 

Celebrate Midsummer, check.

 

Midsummer has a special place in the Finnish calendar, representing the lightest time of the year and the proper start of summer season. Usually a celebration of Juhannus (Midsummer) is spent with friends and family at a summer cottage away from the city, either partying or relaxing. Lighting bonfires and bathing in saunas are two of the main Midsummer traditions in Finland. An important feature of the Midsummer in Finland is the white nights and the midnight sun. Spending the night outdoors admiring the different colors of the midnight sun set over a lake – can it get any better than this?

 

Midsummer

 

Party at a Festival, check.

 

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

 

Fall in Love with Finland, check, check, check!

 

Because once you visit this magic country, it will stay in your heart forever.

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Finland hosts an unbelievable number of music festivals every summer. For many Finns, touring as many festivals as possible throughout the summer is a yearly tradition. Some of the biggest festivals gather tens of thousands of people and have been organized for decades: Ruisrock, Flow Festival, Qstock, Ilosaarirock and many other ones. Oh, there is a Sauna Festival too!

Go Top